Provable benefits of representation learning

Sanjeev Arora, Andrej Risteski

There is general consensus that learning representations is useful for a variety of reasons, e.g. efficient use of labeled data (semi-supervised learning), transfer learning and understanding hidden structure of data. Popular techniques for representation learning include clustering, manifold learning, kernel-learning, autoencoders, Boltzmann machines, etc. To study the relative merits of these techniques, it's essential to formalize the definition and goals of representation learning, so that they are all become instances of the same definition. This paper introduces such a formal framework that also formalizes the utility of learning the representation. It is related to previous Bayesian notions, but with some new twists. We show the usefulness of our framework by exhibiting simple and natural settings -- linear mixture models and loglinear models, where the power of representation learning can be formally shown. In these examples, representation learning can be performed provably and efficiently under plausible assumptions (despite being NP-hard), and furthermore: (i) it greatly reduces the need for labeled data (semi-supervised learning) and (ii) it allows solving classification tasks when simpler approaches like nearest neighbors require too much data (iii) it is more powerful than manifold learning methods.

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